by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

Hanson Launches Pick, Pack, and Parcel

Hanson Launches Pick, Pack, and Parcel

Hanson Logistics has recently expanded its multi-channel distribution offering by launching a new consumer ecommerce fulfillment program titled “Pick, Pack, and Parcel.” Being a leading provider of temperature controlled logistics, Hanson has recognized the growing demand for home delivery of groceries (including frozen and refrigerated foods) and is implementing a service that will help food manufacturers keep up with the market.

ecommerce fulfillmentPick, Pack, and Parcel gives frozen food manufacturers that extra channel to sell their products in a “right to your door” manner, which is becoming increasingly more popular by consumers.

The steps to this program are very simple. Manufacturers ship inventory by truckload to Hanson’s Logansport, Indiana warehouse (we can handle transportation for you as well) where frozen and refrigerated products are kept in top-notch condition until ordered. Then the individual orders are picked, mixed if necessary, packed in usable coolers, and handed off to a parcel carrier for delivery.

The Logansport facility (Lafayette too) is strategically located for parcel delivery to 60% of the United States between one to three days with ground service, assuring efficient coverage of the final mile.

There are very few third-party logistics (3PL) providers in the industry that are qualified to step in and be of assistance with the accuracy, safety, and transparency that is required for consumer frozen and refrigerated food fulfillment.

However, for Hanson these requirements fall right into the sweet spot of what we specialize in when it comes to national retail fulfillment.

Learn how we can specifically help your business streamline operations by contacting us today.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

Why Our SQF Certification Matters to Your Business

Why Our SQF Certification Matters to Your Business

SQF Certified

Last week, we announced that Hanson Logistics has been awarded the Safe Quality Food (SQF) Certification, Edition 8, by the Safe Quality Food Institute (SQFI), a globally trusted, recognized, and accepted food safety and quality program.

This farm-to-fork food safety and quality certification helps food producers assure their buyers that food products have been grown, processed, prepared and handled according to the highest possible global food safety standards. It can immediately improve your standing in the eyes of new partners and deals.

For everyone at Hanson Logistics, this achievement is a great validation of our hard work and our team’s commitment to quality operations. For you, it means increased protection in the event of recalls, improved operational efficiencies in our work together, managed risks, and peace of mind with certified due diligence.

The SQF Certification Process

Hanson Logistics’ Hartford, Michigan temperature-controlled facility received the certification, the first of our eight warehouses to become SQF Certified. There are a variety of requirements that our facility had to meet to achieve certification associated with safety and quality, as well as a commitment to continuous improvement.

The process can take between six and nine months and is a significant investment. We believe the practices it checks for and encourages are a smart way to assure food and perishable safety across the entire supply chain, including sourcing, processing, packaging, and delivery.

A core component of the certification is something that’s mission critical for your business: effective management of food safety hazards. When you hear that Hanson Logistics, or any other partner, is SQF certified, it means that they have a demonstrable commitment and processes in place to create, monitor, and manage a safe environment for food production.

SQFI provides a global, consistent certification process that is one of the most trusted in the world for food safety. The certification is important for every partner in the food supply chain, and we like that the body requires annual reviews to ensure that we are compliant and always follow best practices.

Benefits of SQF Certification

Achieving SQF certification requires that we develop process and business improvements that allow us to proactively identify and manage threats to the products we store and ship for customers like you. In the Hartford facility, these requirements apply to all of our operations, including long-term storage and outbound transportation designed to save you money and deliver your product to their destination as required 

Pairing SQF certification with the ability to fulfill larger, higher-frequency orders can also protect your bottom line by giving you access to a larger market. Not only will you be able to address order demands, but you’ll meet the increasing demand for supplier certifications coming from partners and buyers. Having a certified partner ensures that your operations can support the demands of larger retailers and chains.

You can also reassure your leadership that your products are in good hands.

We see certifications like SQF as a smart way to ensure we stay on top of food safety regulations and requirements. It is in concert with the U.S. Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), designed to improve safety from farm to fork. 

At the end of the day, SQF certification is a demonstration of our commitment to food safety, quality, legality, and support for all of our partners. Or, as our CEO Jim Riets says, “SQF Certification speaks to our team’s effort to meet and exceed that which is expected of them as logistics professionals. It’s recognition of our “Yes We Can” attitude, and we commend our Hartford team for a job well done.” 

Get to Know Our Michigan Facility

Our Hartford location is nestled in the heart of West Michigan’s fruit and vegetable farmlands. Consisting of 7 million cubic ft. of temperature-controlled space, we support a significant part of the regional grower community with offerings including blast freezing, racked storage, transportation management, and an unparalleled commitment to service quality.

Goods shipped from Hartford are labeled with the SQF certification, giving our partners a credibility boost as soon as those boxes and pallets arrive at their next destination.

Today’s consumers have increasingly complex demands for food management and safety. Those concerns are readily visible in the requirements from retailers and vendors. Give your products the best chance to exceed expectations, regulations, and requirements by partnering with an SQF Certified logistics company.

Learn how our certification might even save you money with a more efficient operation by contacting us today.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

5 Reasons to Bundle Transportation and Warehousing with One Provider

5 Reasons to Bundle Transportation and Warehousing with One Provider

Siloed logistics approaches don’t work in today’s cold chain shipping environment. Here’s how to centralize those functions and get back to doing what you do best.

With organizational silos rapidly giving way to more open and collaborative business styles, being able to “flatten out” the logistics function and bundle multiple services with a single provider is becoming more and more important.

“For both small and large transit companies, maintaining multiple locations or expanding into new markets involves lots of variables,” FleetOwner reports. “Exploring costs and service-bundling options could mean greater efficiencies and money saved—and a better chance of success.”

Here’s how cold chain shippers can benefit from bundling:

  1. Focus on your core competencies. No more running around, trying to oversee and micromanage multiple providers and getting them to “talk” to one another. When it’s all under one roof, your central transportation, warehousing, and logistics provider will handle it all for you and allow you to focus on what you do best: supply customers with refrigerated and frozen goods.
  2. Use your provider’s infrastructure to save time and money. Delegating multiple company functions—such as warehousing and distributing—to a single service provider can result in significant time and cost savings. “Bundling these services together with one provider serves to reduce the resources required for oversight as well as provides for economies of scale,” FleetOwner notes, “as a transportation and distribution provider can often utilize their infrastructure and purchasing power to reduce distribution and fleet cost.”
  3. Have a single point of contact. Bundling logistics services with a single provider means you need only make one phone call, send one email, or schedule one meeting to get everything you need. Because this provider will serve as your focal point, you’ll avoid the wasted time, effort, and cost associated with tracking down multiple providers to get your questions answered or problems solved.
  4. Get consistent results. If you’ve historically used multiple providers for your cold chain transportation and warehousing needs, then you probably understand pains like inconsistent service levels, fluctuating rates, and unpredictable outcomes. By bundling these services with a single provider, you can avoid these uncertainties and focus on getting consistent results from one business partner.
  5. Create a win-win partnership. When companies skip around from supplier to supplier, they never really get the chance to create true, lasting partnerships with those providers. By putting the time and effort into working with one logistics provider, companies can create win-win collaborations that can help them shepherd their cold chains through even the toughest logistics environments (i.e., the current driver shortage and capacity crunches).

Demand for next-day delivery, the driver shortage, and rising transportation rates are all pushing cold chain distributors to find ways to work smarter, better, and faster in today’s transportation environment. In their quest to manage more volume and deal with more complex customer demands than they’ve ever faced in the past, more shippers are bundling fulfillment, warehousing, and shipping with single providers that can meet all of their current needs while also helping them prepare for the future.

To improve your cold chain shipping efficiency, contact us today to learn how Hanson can help.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

U.S. Growers Thrive as Consumers Load Up on Fruits and Veggies

U.S. Growers Thrive as Consumers Load Up on Fruits and Veggies

Spring planting time is here and as the produce season kicks into full gear it looks as if 2018 will be another good year for the nation’s food growers. With consumer tastes continuing to tilt in the direction of fresher, local, and more wholesome meal options, the companies that supply fruits and vegetables are in high demand. According to Packaged Fact’s Fresh Produce: U.S. Market Trends and Opportunities report, consumers’ consumption of fresh produce grew steadily—albeit modestly at about 1.3%— between 2011 and 2016. Those moderate annual gains are expected to continue over the next several years through 2021. “Fruit and vegetable producers benefited from steady growth among the U.S. population, as well as from the fact that all age groups have high usage rates, especially Gen X adults,” says Packaged Facts’ David Sprinkle in a press release. “Fruits and vegetables are expected to continue experiencing growth in niche areas as consumers persist in seeking out novel flavors from around the world. Increases in disposable personal income will support purchases of premium fruits and vegetables, including non-GMO, organic, and locally grown types. Also, marketing strategies focusing on health and the delicious taste of fresh produce will help fruits and vegetables to expand their appeal and per capita consumption.”

Millennials Love Frozen Foods

Frozen foods are on a tear this year, and both fruit and vegetable growers are benefitting from consumers’ renewed interest in frozen options. Forty-three percent of Millennial shoppers said they have purchased more frozen foods this year than last year, according to a new report from Acosta. The frozen food revival also crosses generational lines, with 27% of GenXers, 19% of Baby Boomers, and 19% of the Silent Generation are also buying more frozen this year. Acosta attributes the growth to several industry trends, including:
  • Convenience drives prepared meals, and frozen meals enable consumers to have a stock of meals whenever they are out of time/ ideas/ fresh ingredients
  • Health and wellness – frozen food enables companies to offer longer shelf life without preservatives; textures are maintained without the use of artificial ingredients, and manufacturers are able to offer niche products at a better price point, including vegan options.
  • Better value for the money – hectic, unpredictable meal consumption leads to a staggering amount of food waste, and frozen food decreases the amount of food spoilage.
  • The rise of breakfast – with the search for new breakfast options, consumers are warming up to breakfast sandwiches and other frozen baked goods.

Nutritious and Natural Both Rank High

Right now, Food Industry Executive says grocery shopping preferences are “trending heavily toward nutritious, natural foods from transparent manufacturers that share their health goals.” Successful manufacturers are following suit, the publication reports, while convenient and healthy frozen options from restaurant-style appetizers to full dinners and desserts are “revitalizing the frozen food aisle, despite the common belief that fresh trumps frozen.” Packaged Facts points to the Green Giant brand as a good example of how frozen food marketers are getting back on track. The brand changed hands in November 2015, when B&G Foods purchased it from General Mills for $765 million and began breathing new life into the brand. In less than a year it was rolling out a series of new and innovative Green Giant frozen products, including veggie tots, a “kid-friendly, mom-approved alternative to potato tots and French fries that are filled with vegetables such as cauliflower or broccoli instead of potatoes; riced veggies, made from 100% vegetables and with no sauce or seasoning, are positioned as alternatives to traditional rice; and mashed cauliflower, an alternative to the typical potato side dish. “Since the acquisition of this iconic brand, we have been working tirelessly to meet consumer desire for new, delicious ways to incorporate more vegetables into their daily lives,” Robert Cantwell, chief executive officer of B&G Foods told Packaged Facts. “This consumer desire has inspired the creation of new Green Giant frozen innovations, as well as the brand’s modernized persona, with the intention of bringing back the Green Giant with a purpose — adding more vegetables to America’s plates.”

Addressing Logistics Challenges

As produce season heats up, both manufacturers and their logistics providers are keeping an eye on capacity, rates, regulatory changes, and other issues that could impact their supply chains. With U.S. crop volumes growing between May and July—and due to the time-sensitivity of such shipments—expect available frozen and refrigerated capacity to shrink and rates to rise accordingly. “Tight U.S. truck capacity and rising rates marked the first quarter of 2018, and the outlook for the remainder of the year is more of the same, if not worse,” JOC reports. “That is the dilemma for shippers of perishable goods, especially food, who are seeing growing demand from buyers, on the one hand, tempered by a capacity crunch on the other.”
by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

7 Ways to Ensure a Safe “Cold Chain” in the New Year

7 Ways to Ensure a Safe “Cold Chain” in the New Year

If food manufacturers learned just one thing from 2016, it’s that even the most consumer-friendly, beloved brands can quickly fall prey to poor fresh, refrigerated, and frozen food handling. From Chipotle to General Mills, the list of companies that made headlines due to foodborne illnesses was both varied and well documented in industry publications like Food Safety News.

As organizations like The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) learned last year, prevention is not only about pinpointing and mitigating a single culprit; it’s also about keeping the entire end-to-end supply chain safe. In total, about 48 million people (1 in 6 Americans) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die each year from foodborne diseases. This is a significant public health burden that is largely preventable, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The FDA thinks the answer lies in more stringent regulation of the cold supply chain. On July 14, 2016, it issued a final rule to amend and update the agency’s food facility registration requirements, and implement revisions mandated by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). According to the National Law Review, all FSMA comments submitted by March 27, 2017—for both the November 2016 and December 2016 draft guidance documents—will be considered in the drafting of the final version of the guidance.

What’s Behind the FSMA?

According to the FDA, the FSMA will be important for the health of both people and animals, and points to high-profile outbreaks of foodborne illness over the last decade—and data showing that such illnesses strike one in six Americans each year—as the driving force behind the following five core elements:

Preventive controls – For the first time, the FDA has a legislative mandate to require comprehensive, prevention-based controls across the food supply to prevent or significantly minimize the likelihood of problems occurring.

Inspection and Compliance – The legislation recognizes that inspection is an important means of holding an industry accountable for its responsibility to produce safe food.

Imported Food Safety – The FDA has new tools to ensure that imported foods meet U.S. standards and are safe for consumers.

Response – For the first time, the FDA has mandatory recall authority for all food products.The FDA expects that it will only need to invoke this authority infrequently since the food industry largely honors its requests for voluntary recalls.

Enhanced Partnerships – The legislation recognizes the importance of strengthening existing collaboration among all food safety agencies—U.S. federal, state, local, territorial, tribal, and foreign–to achieve our public health goals.

Staying Safe in the New Year

As the FDA nails down the fine points of the FSMA, and as more companies pay attention to the food safety aspects of their refrigerated/frozen supply chains, Hanson Logistics is paying more attention than ever to GFSI protocols, ASI Excellence, and GFM practices in the handling, storage, and delivery of food products. And while food safety has always been a priority, increasing regulation has made food safety a legal issue and the responsibility falls squarely on the shoulders of manufacturers, retailers, and their trading partners.

Here are seven ways that you and your logistics provider(s) can ensure a safer cold chain in the New Year:

  1. Audit your distribution facilities to ensure that safe food handling practices are being implemented and used (i.e., warehousing and storage facilities have their own criteria for audits, especially if they are third-party owned).
  1. Identify risks, focus on any potential problem areas, and put actions in place to fix any issues.
  1. Train all employees on the procedures for safe refrigerated and frozen food handling and distribution. Under the Sanitary Transport Rule guidelines, for example, employees must be trained so they are aware of proper handling and know how to prevent or recognize contamination.
  1. Document all procedures related to the above step and revise/update regularly
  1. Perform all preventative and routine maintenance on a predictable schedule
  1. Utilize technology (applications, software, cloud-based platforms, etc.) to more efficiently manage and track your refrigerated/frozen supply chain
  1. Know, understand, and following the ever-changing regulatory standards associated with the cold chain.

On a final note, the complexity of food safety regulatory standards requires dedication and expertise, and is a critical part of keeping your company up to date with improvements even before they become a law. This forward-looking mentality will give your company a competitive edge and ensure the safety and quality of its refrigerated/frozen supply chain in 2017…and beyond.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

Request the Best Supply Chain

Request the Best Supply Chain

When manufacturers need their product shipped out, they trust Hanson Logistics to get it done.

As a global leader of food and foodservice solutions, Request Foods, Inc. ships over 230 million products every year. This means they need a reliable transportation team.

Five years ago, Request Foods was utilizing multi-drop stops. These stops force a driver to carry one product, making multiple stops each day that can be over five hours apart. Not only do these multi-drop stops take a toll on the driver, they are inefficient in scheduling and communication.

Multi-drop stops are even more ineffective when retailers want small orders to keep stocked inventory low. This is an incredible hurdle for shippers.

That’s when Request Foods utilized Hanson Logistics. They began working in our Velocities Multi-Vendor Consolidation Program. This is where Hanson loads trucks with multiple brands, keeping stops fluid. Drivers can better stay on schedule so products can be delivered on time.

The Velocities Program is creating consistency for Request Foods. Their distribution centers have a better idea when shipments are coming in and a routine is developed, creating seamless shipping for everyone involved.

Don’t settle for inefficiency when it comes to the delivery of your products. Contact Hanson Logistics today for the best in shipping and delivery.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

Break Free of Manual Load Processes

Break Free of Manual Load Processes

Even in today’s technology-centric transportation world, small to midsized carriers rely heavily on fax, email, and the web for communication. To help you break free of these manual, labor-intensive processes, Hanson Logistics offers a load processes tender management platform that maintains a constant pulse on all load tenders – regardless of communication method or carrier size.

The SHIPS Pre-Dispatch workflow solution receives the load tenders and then extracts and interprets the delivery data using an OCR-based forms processing application. This, in turn, creates either an EDI load tender transaction or enters a file directly into the dispatching system (once the load tender is approved).

Carriers benefit from reduced customer service staffing levels, elimination of data entry errors, automated load status to shippers, and good turn-down visibility.

SHIPS Pre-Dispatch also offers:

  • Improved monitoring of websites to select load tenders based on lanes
  • Enhanced visibility to a shipper’s load acceptance and rejection status
  • Decreased customer service labor costs
  • Improved visibility and reporting on load turndowns
  • Increased collaboration between CSRs, management, and dispatchers in a digital workflow environment
  • Increased functionality to your existing document imaging system

If you need a solution that can reduce labor costs, eliminate order entry errors, and improve accuracy, look no further. Hanson Logistics has the answer. By selecting the best mix of automated tendering options that deliver on your cost and service goals, we take the operational work out of managing shipments and allow you to focus on more important business activities.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

5 Things Every Cold Chain Shipper Should Know About the FSMA

5 Things Every Cold Chain Shipper Should Know About the FSMA

About 48 million people (1 in 6 Americans) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die each year from food borne diseases, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), signed into law by President Obama on Jan. 4, 2011, enables FDA to better protect public health by strengthening the food safety system.

As a key element of this preventive approach, FDA was mandated under FSMA to establish science-based, minimum standards for the safe growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of produce on farms to minimize contamination that could cause serious adverse health consequences or death.

The food safety law passed by Congress on December 21, 2010 aims to ensure the U.S. food supply is safe by shifting the focus of federal regulators from responding to contamination to preventing it. FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. issued a written statement shortly after passage. Key facts about this legislation are presented below.

The FSMA is now final, and compliance dates for some businesses begin in September 2016. According to the FDA, this final rule is the product of an unprecedented level of outreach by the FDA to industry, consumer groups, the agency’s federal, state, local and tribal regulatory counterparts, academia, and other stakeholders.

Here are five important points that every cold chain shipper should know about the FMSA:

  1. There are new hazards analysis and risk-based prevention controls. Covered facilities must establish and implement a food safety system that includes an analysis of hazards and risk-based preventive controls. The rule sets requirements for a written food safety plan that includes: Hazard analysis, preventative controls, monitoring, corrective actions/corrections, and verification. The latter, for example, includes validating with scientific evidence that a preventive control is capable of effectively controlling an identified hazard; calibration (or accuracy checks) of process monitoring and verification instruments such as thermometers, and reviewing records to verify that monitoring and corrective actions (if necessary) are being conducted.
  1. Farms aren’t subject to preventive rules control. The EPA’s definition of a “farm” includes two types of farm operations, and operations defined as farms are not subject to the preventive controls rule. A primary production farm is devoted to the growing of crops, the harvesting of crops, the raising of animals (including seafood), or any combination of these activities. A secondary activities farm isn’t located on a primary farm, but it is devoted to harvesting, packing, and/or holding raw agricultural commodities.
  1. Some companies will need risk-based supply chain programs. The FSMA mandates that a manufacturing/processing facility have a risk-based supply chain program for those raw materials and other ingredients for which it has identified a hazard requiring a supply-chain applied control. Manufacturing/processing facilities that control a hazard using preventive controls, for example, or that follow requirements applicable when relying on a customer to controls hazards, need not have a supply-chain program for that hazard.
  1. Employee training will be mandatory. Management is required to ensure that all employees who manufacture, process, pack, or hold food are qualified to perform their assigned duties. Such employees must have the necessary combination of education, training, and/or experience necessary to manufacture, process, pack, or hold clean and safe food. Individuals must receive training in the principles of food hygiene and food safety, including the importance of employee health and hygiene.
  1. Compliance dates for businesses are staggered over several years after publication of the final rule. Here are the deadlines:
  • Very small businesses (averaging less than $1 million per year in both annual sales of human food plus the market value of human food manufactured, processed, packed, or held without sale): Three years
  • Businesses subject to the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (compliance dates extended to allow time for changes to the PMO safety standards that incorporate the requirements of this preventive controls rule): Three years
  • Small businesses (a business with fewer than 500 full-time equivalent employees): Two years
  • All other businesses: One year

Click here to learn more about the FSMA.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

The Statistics Behind Solutions

The Statistics Behind Solutions

Success in today’s fast-moving transportation environment requires 100 percent visibility over the end-to-end, creating supply chain solutions. As your transportation partner, Hanson Logistics provides the access to real-time shipment visibility. This also encompasses online shipping management, reports, efficiency, and customer service that you need. Streamlining your transportation, distribution, and manufacturing operations to create visibility is easy with Hanson. We’re bringing the solutions to your needs.

 According to Gartner, companies that gain visibility over the  status and availability of products reduce inventory levels by 20  percent. They also decrease stock levels to less than seven days  (from over 10 days), reduce freight charges, and cut manpower  needs. Other key benefits include enhanced supply chain efficiencies, enhanced inventory management, and better synchronization of the end-to-end supply chain. These major factors can determine higher success for organizations who utilize it.

Ready to start creating visibility? We can help. Hanson Logistics provides a comprehensive transportation and logistics services suite plus the real-time visibility that you need to operate as efficiently as possible. We also can become a business partner that can help you take better control of your inbound and outbound supply chains through improved visibility. Hanson Logistics is in the pursuit of excellence.

by Hanson Logistics Hanson Logistics

Down with Red Tape: Compelling Reasons to Work with Smaller, Family-Owned Service Providers

Down with Red Tape: Compelling Reasons to Work with Smaller, Family-Owned Service Providers

Defined by Merriam-Webster as a system of government or business that has many complicated rules and ways of doing things, “bureaucracy” is often used to describe the inner workings of any organization that tends to operate with a lot of red tape, rules, policies, and decision makers. Hanson Logistics, on the other hand, has effectively bucked this trend and instead focuses on making it easy for customers of all sizes—and across numerous industries—to do business with it.

Counted among the largest refrigerated public warehouses in the country, Hanson is smaller than the conglomerates and internationally held PRWs.  Smaller companies are well known for their agility, growth potential, and ability to turn on a dime when the market calls for it, and Hanson is no exception.

Add “family-owned” to the equation and the attention to customer service, longevity, and sustainability becomes that much more focused. Rather than concentrating on what’s best for shareholders, for example, smaller firms empower their employees to make decisions instead of just deferring to corporate management. These qualities translate into less bureaucracy and more personal client and supplier relationships.

“When looking for a company to do business with, whether that’s as a supplier, a distributor, or service provider, it can be easy to go straight to the biggest names in the field,” notes Complete Biz Systems’ Size Matters: The Benefits of Doing Business with a Small Company. “However, when you look at the day-to-day reality of business, smaller companies often offer much more in return, providing you with a personal service that could suit your requirements far better than any global corporation ever could.” Just a few of those benefits include:

  • Understanding:  A small company is far more likely to recognize how your business works and what it needs to grow.
  • Accountability:  In large national or international companies, finding the person who is responsible for dealing with your query or complaint can be almost impossible.
  • Accessibility:  When contacting a small company, they’ll know exactly who you need to speak to, and if they’re not in the office, should be able to help you get in touch quickly.
  • Personal service:  Smaller operations are far more likely to take each client on individually, talking through their exact requirements and molding products and services to suit those needs. This way, you get a much more practical and targeted solution for your business needs.
  • Price:  Big businesses may be able to offer competitive prices due to the volume of business that they take on, but generally small companies will be able to offer you better deals on their products.

According to the National Research Center, other great reasons to work with small businesses include the ability to easily build relationships with owners and staff (and perhaps even feel like they’ve become part of a “family”); the opportunity to support the nation’s biggest job creators; and the fact that small business owners are generally experts in their field. This makes them better equipped to answer complex questions or provide innovative solutions for their customers.

For more information on how to leverage Hanson Logistics’ strength as a small, family-run logistics provider please visit us online at www.hansonlogistics.com.